Although the RCMP police contract expires on March 31, 2021, Surrey RCMP is expected to continue operating in Surrey until the transition of the SurrealIst Police Service reaches significant milestones in 2022. [3] Surrey RCMP civilian support staff would continue to work for the new SPD as surrey RCMP Union has signed a transfer agreement. [10] Independent municipal police services are designated as “independent” by a police office. The task of the Police Committee is to give the Division a General Directorate, in accordance with the relevant legislation and in response to the needs of the Community. Each police board is chaired by the mayor of the municipality and consists of one person appointed by the municipal council and a maximum of five persons appointed by the provincial government. The members of the council are civilians. Independent municipal police services are 100% responsible for their policing costs. Integrated Federal Teams: may include members of independent, municipal, provincial and/or federal agencies, but are funded primarily by the federal government. Integrated federal teams/programs are included in the Federal and Organized Crime (FSOC) framework.

FSOC is made up of multidisciplinary groups and teams, such as those that were formerly known as the Integrated Embedded Enforcement Team (IBET), coordinated Marihuana Enforcement Team (CMET) and integrated crime procedures (IPOC). On November 5, 2018, Surrey City Council approved an application to replace Surrey RCMP with a new municipal police force and began the process of terminating its police service agreement with the RCMP. [7] First Nations PolicingBy the First Nations Policing Program (FNPP), the federal and bc governments provide funding to support police services that respond professionally, actively and to the First Nations communities they serve. The FNPP was created in 1991 to allow First Nation municipalities to participate with the federal and provincial governments in the development of an RCMP service dedicated to their municipalities. The FNPP aims to contribute more to First Nations communities to provide policing services in their communities. Regional services provide a central point of management, coordination and accounting for several integrated or autonomous departments in the region. This type of agreement makes it possible to provide specialized and/or administrative police services at the regional level. There is opposition to municipal policing work expressed by community members and the National Police Federation, with the bargaining officer representing 20,000 RCMP officers across Canada. . . .