The rally was meant to shed light on reporters about the looming crisis on the Colorado River, where storage is at record levels, demand is rising, and warming temperatures in a 19-year drought are shaping the bleakest future for a river that irrigates 40 million people in a 244,000-square-mile basin. The system-wide agreement sets the stage for difficult negotiations on a new set of Colorado River operating guidelines, which will expire in 2026. There are also concerns about Nevada`s growing population and the state`s water consumption. Nevada, with the smallest water distribution at the bottom of the river, may find in the near future that the water supplied by the Colorado River will not cover the state`s growing needs. In 2008, Pat Mulroy, executive director of the Southern Nevada Water Authority, said it did not support water redistribution. That`s because every state in the watershed has grown, she says, that Nevada`s allocation is unlikely to increase, and could even decrease. [14] Instead, Nevada, like California, may need to work on conservation methods and find alternative water sources to support the state`s growing population. But an event sparked by Arizona`s legislation, hailed by Governor Ducey as “the most important water legislation in nearly 40 years,” certainly dominated the headlines for early 2019. With no casualties across the states — Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming in the upper basin and Arizona, California and Nevada in the lower basin — the reservoir could reach the trigger point next year, though recent heavy snowfall in the mountains that feed the river may help for some time. If Imperial succeeds in the legal challenge, it could prevent Metropolitan from contributing its share in the water, which in turn could lead to the collapse of the three-state deal. Another big risk is that Lake Mead could eventually fall below 950 feet if the water could no longer turn the dam`s turbines, or even 895 feet if the lake reached “Deadpool” status and no water could flow…